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High-risk ADHD Practices and Amphetamine Addiction

February 6, 2013|ADHD

A recent, sad story in the New York Times highlights the urgent need for better diagnostic evaluations, greater scrutiny of prescribing practices and more use of non-medication approaches for treatment of ADHD.

At CPA, we conduct thorough neuropsychological evaluations to diagnose ADHD and we offer non-medication approaches to manage symptoms of ADHD, including ADHD Coaching and computerized programs to improve attention.

Excerpt from article:

Every morning on her way to work, Kathy Fee holds her breath as she drives past the squat brick building that houses Dominion Psychiatric Associates.

It was there that her son, Richard, visited a doctor and received prescriptions for Adderall, an amphetamine-based medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It was in the parking lot that she insisted to Richard that he did not have ADHD, not as a child and not now as a 24-year-old college graduate, and that he was getting dangerously addicted to the medication. It was inside the building that her husband, Rick, implored Richard’s doctor to stop prescribing him Adderall, warning, “You’re going to kill him.”

It was where, after becoming violently delusional and spending a week in a psychiatric hospital in 2011, Richard met with his doctor and received prescriptions for 90 more days of Adderall. He hanged himself in his bedroom closet two weeks after they expired.

The story of Richard Fee, an athletic, personable college class president and aspiring medical student, highlights widespread failings in the system through which five million Americans take medication for ADHD, doctors and other experts said.

Medications like Adderall can markedly improve the lives of children and others with the disorder. But the tunnel-like focus the medicines provide has led growing numbers of teenagers and young adults to fake symptoms to obtain steady prescriptions for highly addictive medications that carry serious psychological dangers. These efforts are facilitated by a segment of doctors who skip established diagnostic procedures, renew prescriptions reflexively and spend too little time with patients to accurately monitor side effects.

via Concerns About ADHD Practices and Amphetamine Addiction – NYTimes.com.

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