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Coping With a Traumatic Event? Psychological Help is Available

April 18, 2013|Counseling & Psychotherapy

Many people are experiencing traumatic stress responses to the tragic events in Boston. 

Many emotional responses are expected and normal following such violent and traumatic occurrences. But some responses can become excessive and problematic.

Below is a link the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) page that provides information about coping with traumatic events. Content from the page is included below. There is information about what to expect and how to cope with these tragic events.

And, remember, help is always available if you are struggling emotionally. Contact a psychologist, other behavioral health provider or your primary care physician if you need help.

CDC Mass Casualties | Coping With a Traumatic Event: Information for the Public.

A traumatic event turns your world upside down.

After surviving a disaster or act of violence, people may feel dazed or even numb. They may also feel sad, helpless, or anxious. In spite of the tragedy, some people just feel happy to be alive.

It is not unusual to have bad memories or dreams. You may avoid places or people that remind you of the disaster. You might have trouble sleeping, eating, or paying attention. Many people have short tempers and get angry easily.

These are all normal reactions to stress.

It will take time before you start to feel better.

You may have strong feelings right away. Or you may not notice a change until much later, after the crisis is over. Stress can change how you act with your friends and family. It will take time for you to feel better and for your life to return to normal. Give yourself time to heal.

These steps may help you feel better.

A traumatic event disrupts your life. There is no simple fix to make things better right away. But there are actions that can help you, your family, and your community heal. Try to:

  • Follow a normal routine as much as possible.
  • Eat healthy meals.
  • Be careful not to skip meals or to overeat.
  • Exercise and stay active.
  • Help other people in your community as a volunteer.
  • Stay busy.
  • Accept help from family, friends, co-workers, or clergy.
  • Talk about your feelings with them.
  • Limit your time around the sights and sounds of what happened. Don’t dwell on TV, radio, or newspaper reports on the tragedy.

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